Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division II –– Nidāna
Book 12 –– Abhisamaya Saṃyutta
Chapter 6 –– Dukkha Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

12. 6. 1.

(51) Parivīmansana –– Examination

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks, saying “Monks.”

Those Monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.”

3. And the Blessed One said thus:

“Monks, how do you examine the Teaching for the rightful ending of unpleasantness?”

“Venerable sir, the Blessed One’s leading is the Teaching. It is the Blessed One’s refuge. Good that it’s meaning occurs to the Blessed One.”

4. “Then Monks, listen and attend carefully I will tell.”

“Yes, venerable sir,” those monks replied.

And the Blessed One said thus:

5. “Here, monks, the monk examines. The various kinds of unpleasantness that rises in the world as decay and death. Tied to what, rising and born from what and rooted from what is it? When what is present is decay and death. When what is not present is there no decay and death?

6. “The examining monk knows thus:

“The various kinds of unpleasantness that arise in the world with decay and death are tied to birth, arise at birth, are born with birth and are rooted in birth. When birth is present there is decay and death, with the absence of birth there is no decay and death.

7. “He knows decay and death, the arising of decay and death, the cessation of decay and death and the lead to the cessation of decay and death. He falls to that method and lives a life accordingly.

8. “Monks, to this is said the monk has fallen to the method of rightful destruction of unpleasantness through the cessation of decay and death.

9. “Then again the monk examines, in this world, various kinds of unpleasantness arise from being, ... re ... holding, ... re ... craving , ... re ... feelings, ... re ... from contacts, ... re ... six spheres, ... re ... name and matter, ... re ... consciousness, ... re ... determinations , ... re ... Tied to what, arising from what, born from what and rooted in what, is this unpleasantness? When what is present are there determinations? With the absence of what are there no determinations?

10. “The examining monk knows thus:

“The various kinds of unpleasantness that arise in the world with determinations are tied to ignorance, arise with ignorance, are born with ignorance and are rooted in ignorance. When ignorance is present there are determinations, with the absence of ignorance there are no determinations.

11. “He knows determinations, the arising of determinations the cessation of determinations and the lead to the cessation of determinations. He falls to that method and lives a life accordingly, to this is said the monk has fallen to the method of rightful destruction of unpleasantness through the cessation of determinations.

12. “Monks, should a person shrouded in ignorance intend merit, his consciousness reaches to merit. Should a person shrouded in ignorance intend demerit, his consciousness reaches to demerit. Should a person shrouded in ignorance intend imperturbability, his consciousness aims the imperturbable state ...

13. Monks, when the monk’s ignorance has faded and is dispelled when science has arisen he does not intend merit, does not intend demerit neither does he intend imperturbability.

14. “Not intending and not planning he does not cling to anything in the world. The clinging severed he is not worried. Not worried he is extinguished internally. He knows birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived, duties are done, there is nothing more to wish.

15. “He feels pleasant feelings, knows they are impermanent and knows should not cling to them. Or take delight in them. Feels unpleasant feelings, knows they are impermanent and should not cling to them, or delight in them. Feels neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings, knows they are impermanent, knows should not cling to them, or delight in them

16. “Feeling, pleasant feelings he feels them not attached. Feeling, unpleasant feelings he feels them not attached. Feeling, neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings he feels them not attached.

17. “Knowing he will feel feelings, limited to the body and knowing he will feel feelings limited to life. He will know, when the body breaks up, before the end of life, all disagreeable feelings would be cooled and only the body will remain.

18. “Like a man taking out a baked pot from the furnace would put it on level ground and its warmth would extinguish there itself and the pieces of the pot would remain. In the same manner knowing he will feel feelings, limited to the body and knowing he will feel feelings limited to life. He will know, when the body breaks up, before the end of life, all disagreeable feelings will be cooled and only the body will remain.

19. “Then monks, would a monk who has destroyed desires intend merit, would he intend demerit or would he intend the imperturbable. state?”

“Venerable sir, he would intend none of them”

20. “Without any determinations, when determinations have ceased could consciousness be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”.

21. “Without any consciousness, when consciousness have ceased could name and matter be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

22. “Without name and matter, when name and matter have ceased could the six spheres be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

23. “Without the six spheres, when the six spheres have ceased could contacts be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

24. “Without any contacts, when contacts have ceased could feelings be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

25. “Without any feelings, when feelings have ceased could craving be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

26. “Without any craving, when craving have ceased could holding be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

27. “Without any holding, when holding has ceased could ‘being’ be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

28. “Without any being, when being has ceased could birth be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

29. “Without birth, when birth has ceased could decay and death be pointed out?”

“No, venerable sir.”

30. “Excellent monks! In this manner you were led higher and higher. This is the highest good. Monks, find release in this, have no doubts about it. It is the end of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 2.

(52) Upādāna –– Holding

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, craving grows of one who sees enjoyment and grasps sensual and material things. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, a huge flame burns on account of about ten, twenty, thirty or forty cart loads of firewood and a man from time to time puts only dried grass and dried cow dung to it. This flame will burn for a long time, on account of those supports.

4. “In the same manner, monks, craving grows of one who sees enjoyment and grasps sensual and material things. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of grasping, sensual and material things. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

6. “Monks, there is a huge flame burning on account of about ten, twenty, thirty or forty cart loads of fire wood. A man from time to time does not put dried grass and dried cow dung to it. This flame will burn as long as the earlier supports are there and it will extinguish without supports.

7. “In the same manner, monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of grasping sensual and material things. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 3.

(53) Saññojanaṃ I –– Bonds I

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, craving grows of one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, there is a lamp burning on account of some oil and a wick. A man from time to time puts some oil and places a wick for it. This flame will burn for a long time on account of those supports

4. “In the same manner, monks, craving grows of one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger in the bonds. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

6. “Monks, there is a lamp burning on account of some oil and a wick. A man from time to time does not put some oil and does not place a wick for it. This flame will burn as long as the earlier supports are there and it will extinguish without supports.

7. “In the same manner, monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of the bonds. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 4.

(54) Saññojanaṃ II –– Bonds II

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, just as there is a lamp burning on account of some oil and a wick. A man from time to time puts some oil and places a wick for it. This flame will burn for a long time on account of those supports. In the same manner, monks, craving grows of one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, just as there is a lamp burning on account of some oil and a wick. A man from time to time does not put some oil and does not place a wick for it. This flame will burn as long as the earlier supports are there and it will extinguish without supports. In the same manner, monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of the bonds. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 5.

(55) Mahārukkho I –– A Huge Tree I

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, craving grows in one who sees enjoyment and grasps sensual and material things. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, just as there is a great tree, which is supported by the moisture brought by roots going down, across and everywhere. And this tree stands long. In the same manner craving grows in one who sees enjoyment and grasps sensual and material things. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

4. “Monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of grasping sensual and material things. With the cessation of craving holding ceases. With the cessation of holding, being ceases ... re ... Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, just as there is a huge tree and a man comes with hoe and basket. He cuts the tree at the root, digs the ground, round and round the tree, pulls out all the roots together with the very fine ones. He cuts the trunk into pieces, axes them into small bits and dries them in the heat and air, burns them and throws the ashes in the air, or puts the ashes in a fast flowing river. Monks, thus the tree is pulled out from the roots, made a palm stump and made not to grow in the future.

6. “In the same manner, monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of grasping sensual and material things. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 6.

(56) Mahārukkho II –– A Huge Tree II

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, just as there is a great tree, which is supported by the moisture brought by roots going down, across and everywhere. And this tree stands long supported by those supports.

3. “Monks, in this manner craving grows in one who sees enjoyment and grasps sensual and material things. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, just as there is a huge tree and a man comes with hoe and basket. He cuts the tree at the root, digs the ground, round and round the tree, pulls out all the roots together with the very fine ones. He cuts the trunk into pieces, axes them into small bits and dries them in the heat and air, burns them and throws the ashes in the air, or puts the ashes in a fast flowing river. Monks, thus the tree is pulled out from the roots, made a palm stump and made not to grow in the future.

6. “In this manner, monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of grasping sensual and material things. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 7.

(57) Tarunarukkho –– A Young Tree

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika, in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, craving grows in one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, just as there is a young tree, and a man from time to time loosens the ground around it gives manure and water. Supported thus that young tree grows and becomes huge.

4. “In this manner craving grows in one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth arise decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of enjoyment of the bonds. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

6. “Monks, just as there is a young tree and a man comes with hoe and basket. He cuts the tree at the root, digs the ground, round and round the tree, pulls out the all the roots together with the very fine ones. He cuts the trunk into pieces, axes them into small bits and dries them in the heat and air, burns them and throws the ashes in the air, or puts the ashes in a fast flowing river. Monks, thus the tree is pulled out from the roots, made a palm stump and made not to grow in the future.

7. “In this manner, monks, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of enjoying bonds. With the cessation of craving cease holding. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 6. 8.

(58) Nāmarūpa –– Name and Matter

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, name and matter makes an appearance in one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of name and matter are the six spheres ... re ... Thus arises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, just as there is a great tree, which is supported by the moisture brought by roots going down, across and everywhere. And this tree stands long supported by those supports.

4. “In the same manner monks, name and matter makes an appearance in one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of name and matter are the six spheres ... re ... Thus arises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, name and matter does not make an appearance in one who sees the danger in the bonds. With the cessation of name and matter cease the six spheres ... re ... Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

6. “Monks, just as there is a huge tree and a man comes with hoe and basket. He cuts the tree at the root, digs the ground, round and round the tree, pulls out all the roots together with the very fine ones. He cuts the trunk into pieces, axes them into small bits and dries them in the heat and air, burns them and throws the ashes in the air, or puts the ashes in a fast flowing river. Monks, thus the tree is pulled out from the roots, made a palm stump and made not to grow in the future.

7. “Monks, in this manner name and matter does not make an appearance in one who sees the danger of the bonds. With the cessation of name and matter cease the six spheres ... re ... Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

 

12. 6. 9.

(59) Viññaṇam –– Consciousness

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, consciousness makes an appearance in one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of consciousness is name and matter ... re ... Thus arises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

3. “Monks, just as there is a great tree, which is supported by the moisture brought by roots going down, across and everywhere. And this tree stands long, supported by those supports.

4. “In the same manner monks, consciousness makes an appearance in one who sees enjoyment in the bonds. On account of consciousness is name and matter, ... re ... Thus arises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

5. “Monks, consciousness does not make an appearance in one who sees the danger in the bonds. With the cessation of consciousness name and matter ceases ... re ... Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

6. “Monks, just as there is a huge tree and a man comes with hoe and basket. He cuts the tree at the root, digs the ground, round and round the tree, pulls out the all the roots together with the very fine ones. He cuts the trunk into pieces, axes them into small bits and dries them in the heat and air, burns them and throws the ashes in the air, or puts the ashes in a fast flowing river. Monks, thus the tree is pulled out from the roots, made a palm stump and made not to grow in the future.

7. “Monks, in this manner consciousness does not make an appearance in one who sees the danger of the bonds. With the cessation of consciousness cease name and matter ... re ... Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

 

12. 6. 10.

(60) Nidāna –– The Origin

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the country of the Kurus, in a hamlet called Kammasadhamma.

2. Then venerable Ānanda approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting venerable Ānanda said thus to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, the depth and the meaning of the words in Dependent Arising are surprising and wonderful. Yet, they seem to me to be very clear.”

4. “Ānanda, do not say that, indeed the meaning of Dependent Arising, and the words are very deep. Owing to not knowing, not realizing and not penetrating this Teaching, the people are entangled as though in a skein of thread, as though overgrown as a mesh of reeds go to loss, to evil states and hell going on in existences.

5. “Ānanda, the craving of one enjoying the grasping of sensual and material things grows. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being, on account of being is birth. On account of birth there is decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

6. “Ānanda, just as there is a great tree, which is supported by the moisture brought by roots going down, across and everywhere. And this tree stands long, supported by those supports.

7. “In the same manner Ānanda, the craving of one enjoying the grasping of sensual and material things grows. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being, on account of being is birth. On account of birth there is decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus arise the complete mass of unpleasantness.

8. “Ānanda, the craving of one who sees the danger of enjoying the grasping of sensual and material things ceases. With the cessation of craving ceases holding. With the cessation of holding ceases being. With the cessation of being ceases birth. With the ceasing of birth, cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

9. “Ānanda, just as there is a huge tree and a man comes with hoe and basket. He cuts the tree at the root, digs the ground, round and round the tree, pulls out all the roots together with the very fine ones. He cuts the trunk into pieces, axes them into small bits and dries them in the heat and air, burns them and throws the ashes in the air, or puts the ashes in a fast flowing river. Monks, thus the tree is pulled out from the roots, made a palm stump and made not to grow in the future.

10. “In the same manner, Ānanda, craving ceases in one who sees the danger of grasping sensual and material things. With the cessation of craving, holding ceases. With the cessation of holding being ceases. With the cessation of being birth ceases. And with the cessation of birth cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.