Sutta Pitaka
Samyutta Nikàya
Volume IV Ý Saëàyatanavaggo
Samutta 35 Ý Vedanà Saüyutta
Chapter 1 Ý Sagàthà Vaggo

35. 1. 1.
(1) Samàdhi Ý Concentration

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Gosita's monastery in Kapilavatthu

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, these three are feelings. What three? Monks, pleasant feelings, unpleasant feelings, and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings.

4. The disciple of the Blessed One is concentrated, mindful and aware.
Knows feelings and how they arise.

He knows how feelings cease and the method of cessation
The monk with destroyed feelings, is extinguished.û

35. 1. 2.
(2) Sukhàya Ý For Pleasantness

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Gosita's monastery in Kapilavatthu

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, these three are feelings. What three? Pleasant feelings, unpleasant feelings and neither unpleasant nor pleasant, are the three feelings.

4. Pleasant, unpleasant, or neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings
Seized or not seized are all felt things.

Know that all feelings are deceitful and get destroyed
While feeling see the fading and lose interest for them.û

35. 1. 3.
(3) Pahànena Ý By Dispelling

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Gosita's monastery in Kapilavatthu.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, these three are feelings. What three? Pleasant feelings, unpleasant feelings and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three;

4. ßMonks, the latent tendency to greed should be dispelled for pleasant feelings the latent tendency to repulse for unpleasant feelings and the latent tendency to ignore should be dispelled for neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

5. ßMonks, when the monk's latent tendency to greed for pleasant feelings, the latent tendency to repulse unpleasant feelings and the latent tendency to ignore neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are dispelled, it is said that the monk's latent tendency to greed is dispelled. To this it is said, the monk has come to right view, destroyed craving, turned away the bonds and fully and correctly grasping pride has ended unpleasantness.

6. Ignorant about feelings, someone feels pleasant,

He has the latent tendency to greed,
Not knowing the escape.

Ignorant about feelings, someone feels unpleasant,
He has the latent tendency to repulse,
Not knowing the escape.

The wise one has preached, the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings
Someone enjoying that too is not released from unpleasantness.

The monk zealous and aware does not give up dispelling,
Until he wisely and thoroughly understands all feelings.

He that is without desires even now, thoroughly knows feelings
After death, that wise one will not be reckoned.û

 

35. 1. 4.
(4) Pàtàla Ý Abyss

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Gosita's monastery in Kapilavatthu.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, the not learned ordinary man says `there is an abyss in the ocean,' those words he says of something not present, not evident

4. ßMonks, `abyss' is a synonym for bodily unpleasant feelings.

5. ßMonks, the not learned ordinary man touched by bodily unpleasant feelings grieves, is fatigued, wails, beats the breast and comes to bewilderment of mind. To this it is said the not learned ordinary man does not rise from, or fathom the depths of the ocean

6. ßMonks, the learned noble disciple touched by bodily unpleasant feelings does not grieve, is not fatigued, does not wail, beat the breast or come to bewilderment of mind. To this, it is said the noble disciple has risen from and fathomed the depths of the ocean.

If someone does not endure arisen bodily unpleasant feelings
Which ends life, frightens and arouses laments,
That feeble one, does not rise from the abyss
And fathom its depth.

If someone endures arisen bodily unpleasant feelings
Which ends life, frightens and arouses laments,
And is not afflicted by them,
He rises and fathoms the depths of the abyss.û

35. 1. 5.
(5) Daññhabena Ý By Knowing

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Gosita's monastery in Kapilavatthu.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, these three are feelings. What three? They are pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings. Pleasant feelings should be known as unpleasant. Unpleasant feelings should be known as piercing and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings as impermanent.

4. ßMonks, when the monk sees pleasant feelings as unpleasant, unpleasant feelings as pricking and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings as impermanent, it is said, the monk has come to right view, destroyed craving, turned away the bonds and fully and correctly grasping pride, has ended unpleasantness.

He who saw pleasant feelings as unpleasant and unpleasant feelings as a prick
Peaceful neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings as impermanent
Comes to right view thoroughly knowing feelings Here and now he is without desires
After death, that righteous one will not be reckoned.û

35. 1. 6.
(6) Sallattena Ý With a Pricked Self

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Gosita's monastery in Kapilavatthu

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, the not learned ordinary man feels pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

4. ßMonks, the learned noble disciple too feels pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

5. ßThen monks, what is the difference, distinction and excellence between the learned noble disciple and the not learned ordinary man?û

6. ßVenerable sir, the lead to the Teaching is from the Blessed One. Hearing it from the Blessed One the monks will bear it in their minds.û

7. ßMonks, the not learned ordinary man touched by unpleasant feelings grieves, wearies, wails, beats the breast and comes to bewilderment of mind. He feels for two feelings bodily and mental.

8. ßLike a man pricked by an arrow, is pricked by a second arrow and feels for two pricks. In the same manner the not learned ordinary man touched by unpleasant feelings grieves, wearies, wails, beats the breast and comes to bewilderment of mind. He feels for two feelings bodily and mental. Touched by those same unpleasant feelings he becomes repulsive, as a result repulsive latent tendencies stream to him. When touched by unpleasant feelings he enjoys sensual pleasures. What is the reason? Monks, the not learned ordinary man does not know the escape from unpleasant feelings other than by enjoying sensual pleasures. When enjoying sensual pleasures, the latent tendency to greed for pleasant feelings, stream to him. He does not know as it really is the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and the escape from those feelings. As a result the latent tendency to ignore, neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings, streams to him. As a result, he feels pleasant feelings tied to them, feels unpleasant feelings tied to them and feels neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings tied to them. Monks, to this it is said, the not learned ordinary man is tied to birth, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. I say he is tied to unpleasantness.

9. ßMonks, the learned noble disciple touched by unpleasant feelings does not grieve, is not wearied, does not wail, beat the breast and come to bewilderment of mind. He feels for one feeling, only bodily feelings and not for mental feelings.

10. ßLike a man pricked by an arrow, is not pricked by a second arrow and feels for one prick. In the same manner the learned noble disciple touched by unpleasant feelings does not grieve, is not wearied, does not wail, beat the breast and come to bewilderment of mind. He feels for one feeling, only bodily feelings and not mental feelings Touched by those same unpleasant feelings he does not become repulsive and repulsive latent tendencies do not stream to him. When touched by unpleasant feelings he does not enjoy sensual pleasures. What is the reason? Monks, the learned noble disciple knows the escape from unpleasant feelings, other than by enjoying sensual pleasures. When he does not enjoy sensual pleasures, the latent tendency, to greed for pleasant feelings do not stream to him. He knows as it really is the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and the escape from those feelings. As a result the latent tendency to ignore, neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings do not stream to him. As a result, he feels pleasant feelings not tied to them, feels unpleasant feelings not tied to them and feels neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings not tied to them. Monks, to this it is said, the learned noble disciple is not tied to birth, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. I say he is not tied to unpleasantness.

11. ßMonks, this is the discrimination, peculiarity and the difference of the learned noble disciple and the not learned ordinary man.

The wise do not feel for pleasant,
unpleasant or the highly appeased feelings
This is the most prominent and clever difference
between the wise one and the ordinary man.

The minds of the learned, who have mastered
The Truth of this and the other world
Are not happy for pleasant things
Or disturbed about unpleasant things.

The clamoring and the opposition
Scattered and faded are not evident,
They thoroughly know the end of `being',
Is the stainless, non grieving state; extinction.û

35. 1. 7.
(7) Gela¤¤a 1 Ý The Sick 1

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. The Blessed One, getting up from his seclusion in the evening approached the hall where the sick stay, approaching the hall for the sick the Blessed One sat on the prepared seat and addressed the monks: ßMonks, the monk mindful and aware should welcome time! This is our advice to you\!

3. ßMonks, how does the monk become mindful?

Here, monks, the monk abides mindful and aware zealously, to dispel, covetousness and displeasure for the world, reflecting the body in the body, reflecting feelings in feelings, the mental states in the mind and reflecting thoughts in the Teaching.

Monks, in this manner the monk is mindful.

4. ßMonks, how does the monk become aware?

Here, monks, the monk proceeding and receding becomes aware, looking on and looking back becomes aware, bending and stretching limbs becomes aware, bearing the bowl and robes becomes aware, tasting, drinking, eating and enjoying becomes aware. Urinating and excreting he becomes aware. Going, standing, sitting or lying if awake he becomes aware, talking or becoming silent he becomes aware. Monks, in this manner the monk becomes aware.

5. ßMonks, the monk mindful and aware should welcome time! This is our advice to you!

6. ßMonks, to the monk abiding mindful and aware diligent and zealous to dispel arises pleasant feelings and he knows. This pleasant feeling has arisen to me, it has arisen dependently. Dependent on what has it arisen? This pleasant feeling has arisen dependent on this same body, which is also dependently arisen. So how could it be permanent?. He abides reflecting the body and the pleasant feeling as impermanent, as fading, as ceasing, as something he has given up. When reflecting in this manner his latent tendency to greed fades.

7. ßMonks, to the monk abiding mindful and aware diligent and zealous to dispel, arises unpleasant feelings and he knows. This unpleasant feeling has arisen to me, it has arisen dependently. Dependent on what has it arisen? This unpleasant feeling has arisen dependent on this same body, which is also dependently arisen. So how could it be permanent?. He abides reflecting the body and the unpleasant feeling as impermanent, as fading, as ceasing, as something he has given up. When reflecting in this manner his latent tendency to repulse fades.

8. ßMonks, to the monk abiding mindful and aware diligent and zealous to dispel, neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings arise and he knows. These neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings have arisen to me, they have arisen dependently. Dependent on what? These neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings have arisen dependent on this same body, which is also dependently arisen. So how could it be permanent?. He abides reflecting the body and the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings as impermanent, as fading, as ceasing, as something he has given up. When reflecting in this manner his latent tendency to ignore fades.

9. ßFeeling a pleasant feeling he knows, that it is impermanent, should not cling to it and should not delight in it. Feeling an unpleasant feeling he knows, that it is impermanent, should not cling to it and repulse it. Feeling a neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling he knows, that it is impermanent, should not cling to it and should not delight in it.

10. ßFeeling a pleasant feeling he feels unbound. Feeling an unpleasant feeling he feels unbound. Feeling a neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling he feels unbound.

11. ßFeeling feelings limited by the body he knows I feel feelings limited by the body Feeling feelings limited to life he knows I feel feelings limited to life. He knows that at the break up of the body, before life ends, all feelings, all enjoyments not enjoyed should be cooled.

12. ßMonks, dependent on oil and a wick a light would be kindled. With the exhaustion of oil and the wick the light extinguishes. In the same manner monks feeling feelings limited by the body he knows I feel feelings limited by the body Feeling feelings limited to life he knows I feel feelings limited to life. He knows that at the break up of the body, before life ends, all feelings, all enjoyments not enjoyed should be cooled.û

35. 1. 8.
(8) Gela¤¤a 2 Ý The Sick 2

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. The Blessed One, getting up from his seclusion in the evening approached the hall where the sick stay, approaching the hall for the sick the Blessed One sat on the prepared seat and addressed the monks: ßMonks, the monk mindful and aware should welcome time! This is our advice to you!

3. ßMonks, how does the monk become mindful?

ßHere, monks, the monk abides mindful and aware zealously, to dispel, covetousness and displeasure for the world, reflecting the body in the body, reflecting feelings in feelings, the mental states in the mind and reflecting thoughts in the Teaching.

ßMonks, in this manner the monk is mindful.

4. ßMonks, how does the monk become aware?

Here, monks, the monk proceeding and receding becomes aware, looking on and looking back becomes aware, bending and stretching limbs becomes aware, bearing the bowl and robes becomes aware, tasting, drinking, eating and enjoying becomes aware. Urinating and excreting he becomes aware. Going, standing, sitting or lying if awake he becomes aware, talking or becoming silent he becomes aware. Monks, in this manner the monk becomes aware.

5. ßMonks, the monk mindful and aware should welcome time! This is our advice to you!

6. ßMonks, to the monk abiding mindful and aware diligent and zealous to dispel arises pleasant feelings and he knows. This pleasant feeling has arisen to me, it has arisen dependently. Dependent on what has it arisen? This pleasant feeling has arisen dependent on a contact. That contact is also impermanent, compounded and dependently arisen. So how could the pleasant feeling that has arisen on account of an impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen contact be permanent? He abides reflecting the contact and the pleasant feeling as impermanent, as fading, as ceasing, as something he has given up. When reflecting in this manner his latent tendency to greed fades.

7. ßMonks, to the monk abiding mindful and aware diligent and zealous to dispel, arises unpleasant feelings and he knows. This unpleasant feeling has arisen to me, it has arisen dependently. Dependent on what has it arisen? This unpleasant feeling has arisen dependent on a contact. That contact is also impermanent, compounded and dependently arisen. So how could the unpleasant feeling that has arisen on account of an impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen contact be permanent? He abides reflecting the contact and the unpleasant feeling as impermanent, as fading, as ceasing, as something he has given up. When reflecting in this manner his latent tendency to repulse fades.

8. ßMonks, to the monk abiding mindful and aware diligent and zealous to dispel arises neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings and he knows. This neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling has arisen to me, it has arisen dependently. Dependent on what has it arisen? This neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling has arisen dependent on a contact. That contact is also impermanent, compounded and dependently arisen. So how could it be permanent?. He abides reflecting the contact and the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling as impermanent, as fading, as ceasing, as something he has given up. When reflecting in this manner his latent tendency to ignore fades.

9. ßFeeling a pleasant feeling he knows, that it is impermanent, should not cling to it and should not delight in it. Feeling an unpleasant feeling he knows, that it is impermanent, should not cling to it and repulse it. Feeling a neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling he knows, that it is impermanent, should not cling to it and should not delight in it.

10. ßFeeling a pleasant feeling he feels unbound. Feeling an unpleasant feeling he feels unbound. Feeling a neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling he feels unbound.

11. ßFeeling feelings limited by the body he knows I feel feelings limited by the body Feeling feelings limited to life he knows I feel feelings limited to life. He knows that at the break up of the body, before life ends, all feelings, all enjoyments not enjoyed should be cooled.

12. ßMonks, dependent on oil and a wick a light would be kindled. With the exhaustion of oil and the wick the light extinguishes. In the same manner monks feeling feelings limited by the body he knows I feel feelings limited by the body Feeling feelings limited to life he knows I feel feelings limited to life. He knows that at the break up of the body, before life ends, all feelings, all enjoyments not enjoyed should be cooled.û

35. 1. 9.
(9) Anicca Ý Impermanent

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there.

3. ßMonks, these three are the feelings that are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, decrease, fade, lose interest and cease.

4. ßWhat three? They are pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

5. ßMonks, these three are the feelings that are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, decrease, fade, lose interest and cease.û

35. 1. 10.
(10) Phassamålakà Ý Dependent on Contact

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there.

3. ßMonks, these three are the feelings that rise from depend on, originate from and is on account of a contact.

4. ßWhat three? They are pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

5. ßMonks, on account of a pleasant contact arises a pleasant feeling. On account of the cessation of that same pleasant contact appeases and ceases that same pleasant feeling.

6. ßMonks, on account of an unpleasant contact arises an unpleasant feeling. On account of the cessation of that same unpleasant contact appeases and ceases that same unpleasant feeling.

7. ßMonks, on account of a neither unpleasant nor pleasant contact arises a neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling. On account of the cessation of that same neither unpleasant nor pleasant contact appeases and ceases that same neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling.

8. ßJust as monks the coming together and the striking of two pieces of wood arouses warmth and fire, the separation and putting apart of the respective pieces of wood causes the cessation of the respective warmth.

9. ßIn the same manner monks, these three feelings rising from, dependent on, originating from and are on account of a contact cease when the respective contact ceases.û